Sunday, March 7, 2010

Chapter 95- Swami in Disguise of an Old Brahmin Meets Siddhaiyya

That great devotee and focused disciple of Swami who knew nothing except devotion for his Guru, was walking incessantly towards ‘Banagana Palle’ village. The darkness of night couldn’t deter him, the rocky and thorny way through forest couldn’t break him down, he was neither aware of the sunrise, nor was aware of the time. His mind was occupied with only the image of his Guru and his lips were busy chanting his Guru’s mantra. He was still walking on and on.
On the way a monk appeared in saffron clother having matted hair. His aura looked as like as Lord ‘Parameswara’. But Siddhiayya didn’t notice his presence at all and kept moving ahead.

That monk called him from behind, “Siddha!”, Siddhaiyya slowed down but didn’t even think how did that monk knew his name. Monk asked him, “Where are you heading to?”. Siddhaiyya didn’t want to wste any time so he simply told him about his mission in simple headlines, and kept walking. Monk cried from behind, “Siddha! Wait a second!”, Siddhaiyya halted abruptly. Monk said, “You have been walking whole night and more than half of the day has already passed, still you are not even half the distance to your destination. So, accept my suggestion and collect three fistful leaves and take them. If your devotion for your Guru is firm, If your Guru is really a divine personality, those three fistful of leaves would automatically become fragrant flowers. Do as I say, don’t waste your time!”

Siddhaiyya didn’t want to waste his precious time in debating with him, so he neglected his suggestion and started walking ahead fast. But noticing some strange silence he turned back out of curiosity. Alas! The monk had vanished! Siddhaiyya then understood that he was his own Guru, and as per his Guru’s instructions, first he went towards a nearby well, bathed and sat there to perform ‘Sandhya Vandanam’ (worship), and subsequently collected three fistful of thornless leaves and kept inside his bag. The next moment itself he sensed good fragrance emanating from his bag. When he opened his bag, to his astonishment, he found the bag completely filled with various kinds of flowers. He saluted his Guru within his mind and then started running back towards Swami’s Mutt.

On the way Swami again appeared but this time as an old Brahmin. Siddhaiyya stopped and asked him, “Sir! Where are you coming from?” That old man replied, “Son! I had been to a nearby village for some work, today morning while I was travelling back to my village, on the way I had to pass through ‘Kandimallayya Palle’ where I heard from few villagers that ‘Sri Veera Brahmendra Swami’ was ascending to ‘Jeeva Samadhi’. I thought to visit him once and went directly to his Mutt. The entire Mutt was dazzling with beautiful decoration. Swami preached divine Kalagyana to us and then we were given clothes and food”. Taking out the gift from his bag he said, “See I’ve received this nice piece of clothes! Swami then sat inside the Samadhi and the doors were closed and sealed from all sides”.

Siddhaiyya broke into tears and said, “Oh God! How unfortunate I am! My Guru who is my soul, he entered into Samadhi alone! I couldn’t reach in time! Oh God! What a sinner I’m that I couldn’t meet my Guru once for the last time!” He cried like a child for a while, and then took a deep breath and asked the Old Brahmin, “Sir! Is that true or are you trying to test me by any chance? Is that true that my Guru who is my soul, he entered into Samadhi leaving me alone?” Old Brahmin replied,”Son! In this old age, why should I try to crack jokes? Moreover, just now when you told, I got informed that he was your preceptor. I swear, your Guru has entered Samadhi. I witnessed it, son!”

“Siddhaiyya lost all his energy after hearing Old man’s words, he collapsed on the ground and started crying, “Hey Gurudeva! From my childhood I served you for twelve years. You have always chanted my name calling me ‘Siddha! Siddha!’ and cared for me like a father. When your own sons hated me and pushed me out of you home, you scolded them and protected me. What happened to your compassion today, O father! You never kept me away from you even for a second, wherever you went, you took me along with you . Today for what sin of mine you have punished me with this separation, O Guruprabhu? O ever compassionate Swami! What sin of mine made you become so stone hearted today? Had I known about this earlier, I would never have accepted going to get flowers! What an unfortunate soul I’m that I couldn’t see your divine face for the last time, I couldn’t hear your words this time which always used to sound as sweet as ambrosia in my ears. O Lord! Why have you done such a deceit with me!”

Siddhaiyya cried like a child rolling on the ground. The old Brahmin said, “Crazy fellow! Being a disciple of that great Guru also if you cry like a child then what’s the use of the knowledge you acquired? What’s the use of crying on this matter? Past is past, look towards the future! Remember your duties, recollect the wisdom what you acquired from your preceptor”. And in a flash he vanished from there.

Siddhaiyya got up, wiped his tears, and ran towards the Kandimallayya Palle village.


FOOTNOTES

This unparalleled devotion and love for his Guru which made him weep like a child remainds me of a Puranic story of ‘Mahakaleshwara Jyotirlinga’; where a five year old boy makes a ‘Shiva Linga’ (Shiva’s symbol) with clay and worships with overwhelming devotion. His mother unaware of his devotional levels angrily throws that Linga away. That was just a lump of mud for his mother, but it was Lord Shiva sitting in front of him for that boy. Seeing his Shiva thrown away, he gives a loud cry and bursts into tears. Hearing his cry Lord Hanuman (Shiva’s form) immediately appears before him and shows him the form of Shiva and blesses him with great boons.

The purpose of this note is to say that when true devotion flows out of one’s heart for one’s God / Guru, if that is stopped or gets hurt in someway, it pains a lot and the devotee bursts into tears.

2 comments: